Fox Run in our Therapy Department for a Director of Clinical Services.

We currently have an opening at Fox Run in our Therapy Department for a Director of Clinical Services.

Please apply on our website at https://foxruncenter.com/ and click on Careers.

 

 

This position is based in St. Clairsville, OH, 10 minutes from Wheeling, WV.

 

Encourage, Empower, and Enrich at Fox Run

 

Fox Run: The Center for Children and Adolescents, a subsidiary of UHS, is seeking a dynamic and talented Director of Clinical Services (DCS) to join our team.

 

Located in St. Clairsville (OH), this 100-bed facility thrives on passionate and dedicated personnel, while incorporating innovative technology and therapies for the betterment of our patients. Here at Fox Run, we Encourage our employees and patients to work towards a brighter future, Empower them to accomplish their goals, and by doing so, Enrich our own lives as well as those of others in our communities.

 

Key Responsibilities include:

  • Providing the leadership and strategic planning of social services and programs offered at Fox Run;
  • Ensuring programs meet the needs of the community and the performance goals and objectives of the facility;
  • Overseeing the overall administrative processes and management systems for all non-nursing clinical services offered at the facility;
  • Supervising all therapists and case managers to include, but not limited to, timeliness and accuracy of clinical documentation
  • Developing and implementing all clinical treatment programs;
  • Communicating with executive leadership about department, including creating and implementing areas for improvement;
  • Ensuring ongoing staff education needs are met.

Requirements:

  • Master’s degree from an accredited program related to mental health.
  • A minimum of (3) years of supervisory experience in a psychiatric/mental health environment.
  • Experience treating children and adolescents preferred.
  • LISW-S and/or LPCC-S preferred.
  • Ohio licensed or transferrable equivalent required.

This opportunity provides the following:

  • Challenging and rewarding work environment
  • Growth and development opportunities within UHS and its subsidiaries
  • Competitive Compensation
  • $5,000 sign-on bonus
  • Excellent Medical, Dental, Vision and Prescription Drug Plan
  • 401k plan with company match
  • Generous Paid Time Off
  • Relocation expenses

Apply at www.foxruncenter.com

 

Universal Health Services, Inc. (UHS) knows what it takes to lead, inspire and succeed. One of the nation’s largest and most respected hospital companies, UHS owns and operates through its subsidiaries acute care hospitals, behavioral health facilities and ambulatory centers in the United States, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and the United Kingdom.

 

UHS built an impressive record of achievement and performance, steadily growing from a startup company with zero revenue into a Fortune 300 corporation with annual revenue that exceeds $9 billion. The company’s operating philosophy has proven to be effective: Build or acquire high quality hospitals in rapidly growing markets, then invest in the people and equipment needed to allow each facility to thrive and become a dominant healthcare provider in its community.

 

Headquartered in King of Prussia, PA, UHS ranks on the Fortune 500 list of America’s largest corporations with over 80,000 employees, and is consistently listed among Fortune’s “Most Admired Companies” and one of the 30 Most Meaningful Companies To Work For in America by Business Insider.

 

UHS is not accepting unsolicited assistance from search firms for this employment opportunity. Please, no phone calls or emails. All resumes submitted by search firms to any employee at UHS via-email, the Internet or in any form and/or method without a valid written search agreement in place for this position will be deemed the sole property of UHS. No fee will be paid in the event the candidate is hired by UHS as a result of the referral or through other means.

 

EOE

Teaching kids about mental health

Teaching kids about mental health should not stop once they leave the house. School is an important place for them to learn more, and school counselors and teachers should have resources about mental illness and suicide. It’s also beneficial for a child to have a non-biased counselor to talk to if they have questions they don’t feel comfortable asking you, or if they’re having mental health concerns about themselves.

A great resource for schools is NAMI Ending the Silence, an in-class presentation in which students learn about mental illness from someone with lived experience. Having conversations and learning about mental health in school will only reinforce the information you share with your child at home. The more education your child receives about mental health, the more important it will seem.

Child-Centered Play Therapy

 

 

 

Child-Centered Play Therapy

 

 

Presenter: Sonia Hinds, APRN, PMH-BC, RPT-S

12 Clock Hours/1.2 CEUs

 

COST: $353.00

 

When:

Thursday, October 25, 2018 at 8:30 AM

-to-

Friday, October 26, 2018 at 4:30 PM

 

This workshop is designed for:

 

Social workers (LCSW, LMSW, LISW, BSW, AAW), psychologists (Ph.D., Psy.D., Ed.D.) school counselors, school psychologist, professional counselors (LMHC, LCMHC, CMHC, LPC, LCPC), marriage and family therapists (LMFT, LIMFT) art therapists, play therapists, occupational therapists, graduate students, and others in the mental health-related field.

 

Description:

During this session, participants will be introduced to the entire play therapy process from start to finish, including how to make skilled responses, identifying therapeutic themes and issues, tracking progress, setting limits, responding to questions and making decisions about termination of sessions.  Additionally, participants will learn how to select toys for the playroom and work with parents effectively. This workshop will provide a framework for conducting play therapy in order to begin conducting this work immediately. Includes didactic information and videotape presentation, as well as role-play and hands-on practice.  If you are serious about play therapy, this workshop is a MUST!  It is CBPS’ thought that every therapist working with children in a mental health capacity should have this training as a foundation regardless of the play therapy modality being used.

 

 

REGISTER/LEARN MORE

 

 

 

 

 

CBPS is approved to offer Continuing Education to:

 

Social Workers (DC, MD, VA, NY, NJ, PA and most other states), MFTs, Play Therapists, Art Therapists (LCAT, ATR-BC), Psychologists (in MD and DC only), School Psychologists, and LPCs nation-wide.

In NY: LMHCs, MFTs and Social Workers

PROTECTING CHILDREN, PRESERVING FAMILIES:Lessons from the Indian Child Welfare Act

 a WVU School of Social Work co-sponsored event approved for CE hours in Morgantown on 10/30. Please share widely 

https://socialwork.wvu.edu/ce/continuing-education

PROTECTING CHILDREN, PRESERVING FAMILIES:Lessons from the Indian Child Welfare Act
Presented by: Sarah Kastelic, Ph.D., M.S.W., Executive Director of the National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA)
October 30, 2018
7-8pm

WVU Mountainlair Ballroom, Morgantown, WV
Free parking upper floor Mountainlair Garage after 6pm

Approved for 1 SW CE hour for licensed social workers in WV, PA, MD, & VA
No RSVP needed

Event sponsored by the Carolyn Reyer Fund for Native American Studies with assistance from: the Department of Political Science, Department of Psychology, College for Education & Human Resources-Child Development & Family Studies Program and School of Social Work.

Dr. Kastelic will address the historic roots of the passage of the Indian Child Welfare Act, in particular, the importance of tribal and cultural affiliation for American Indian and Alaska Native children, and for Indigenous peoples generally. The passage of ICWA, and ongoing measures to see that it is uniformly enforced, are part of overall efforts to prevent Native children from becoming “cultural orphans.” All those who work to protect children and facilitate healthy, functioning families will be able to learn from the example of the strong advocacy provided through the initial passage of ICWA and the important work that continues through the National Indian Child Welfare Assoc. today. Nationwide, many states have seen increases in the percentage of children being removed from their homes due to the co-mingled factors of parental drug abuse and child neglect. Indeed, states that have been heavily impacted by the current opioid crisis, including West Virginia, depend on the skills of effective social workers to protect children and assist in their foster care placement and/or adoption when necessary

West Virginians for Affordable Health Care

The Children’s Health Collaborative Project’s first challenge is to develop a comprehensive statewide picture of what is already happening in schools and communities in West Virginia. Through surveys of diverse school, health care, and community stakeholders, followed by phone interviews, focus groups, and site visits, we will create a list of programs, key players, community leaders, and successful models to share across the state. Your participation is vital to the success of this worthwhile project!

For Social Workers in the Clinical Setting- https://survey.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6yPB7X8Thf7lTlb

For Social Workers in the Community Setting- https://survey.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3yf7kS957M7LA3z

For Social Workers in the School Setting- https://survey.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_abkkKhWvbwwzPnv

Background: The West Virginia Children’s Health Collaborative Project, a program of West Virginians for Affordable Health Care, is an innovative partnership between children’s health policy experts, health providers, educators, parents, and community leaders who share the common goal to see every West Virginia child insured, linked to a doctor’s office or primary care provider, and receiving coordinated and continuous needed health and social services. We will build on successful models across our state, support the good work that has already been done, and work to make even more progress.

 

Even though West Virginia is a national leader in reducing the rate of uninsured children and has more school-based health centers per person than any other state, we still see children’s overall health and well-being ranked close to the bottom in national surveys. Today a growing number of West Virginia’s children are in disrupted families and in transition, which creates new barriers to enrollment. And even with an insurance card in-hand, it is difficult to link these children to a medical home and coordinated, continuous care.

 

The Children’s Health Collaborative Project’s first challenge is to develop a comprehensive statewide picture of what is already happening in schools and communities so we can then:

 

1) Assist families of children who do not have private health insurance enroll into West Virginia Medicaid and our Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP);

 

2) Connect children and families to a medical home that can coordinate health and social services; and

 

3) Plan for continuity of services when school is out of session.

 

Through surveys of diverse school, health care, and community stakeholders, followed by phone interviews, focus groups, and site visits, we will create a list of programs, key players, community leaders, and successful models to share across the state.

 

Following the statewide assessment, in August we will share what we learned from our surveys and plan how to both replicate great programs and advance policy changes that can help strengthen the children’s wheel of services – both hub and spokes. We will also have the foundation to create a network of local children’s health experts and community champions who are dedicated to informing policymakers and taking action to improve children’s health and wellbeing at the community, state, and federal levels.

 

Until now, there’s been no uniform effort to compile a comprehensive, statewide picture of how we’re addressing health care in our schools. But The Children’s Health Collaborative Project is not just another research project. It is an initiative to catalyze new voices to speak out and bring positive change supported by a foundation of knowledge and an understanding of what really works to get our children the health care and social service supports that empowers them to succeed.

 

How to Help?

 

We are looking for anyone who has a stake in our children’s lives. If you would like to help – in a large or small role – or learn more – please contact West Virginians for Affordable Health Care at info@wvahc.org or call 304.444.5917.

 

Children’s Health Collaborative Project Presentation

The Children’s Health Collaborative Project one-pager- Color (1)

Dolly Parton Imagination Library in Monongalia County

The United Way is launching the Dolly Parton Imagination Library in Monongalia County. Every child between the ages of birth to five that signs up for the program will receive a free quality book in the mail once a month.  Early literacy is one of the most effective ways to ensure children grow up to be successful and self-sufficient adults.

This is a completely free program for the children and there are no household income requirements.  We want to sign up as many children as possible in our community…and we need YOUR help!

Help us spread the word about the Imagination Library kickoff event to be held on May 23rd. We will have online signups at the event and would appreciate you encouraging parents/guardians to participate.  After the event, we will be providing an online link, so your organization can sign up families or the parents can sign up their own children.

Please see the attached flyer and thank you for your support as a partner in helping our children be future community leaders.

Program Launch

May 23 • 5:30-7:30 P.M.

Suncrest Center • 523 Junior Ave.

Free Sign up for Ages 0-5

LIVE BUG DISPLAY

Refreshments, Crafts, Book

Readings, Giveaways, and more!