How to Prevent Geotagging on Android and iOS

Removing EXIF is a really good idea. As a survivor of cyber stalking and harassment, I can’t stress this enough. I highly recommend that you prevent geolocation data from ever being stored in your images in the first place by turning it off in Android and iOS.

In Android, open the Camera app and tap the round circle to the right of the shutter button, and from the resulting menu, tap the “Settings” icon.

In the settings menu tap the “Location” button. The geolocation should be disabled. The icon overlaid on the options button should show this. If you’re using the newer Camera app like the one in Android 5.0 Lollipop, just swipe right to expose the options and tap the “Settings” gear (it will be on the bottom-right in portrait mode). From this settings screen, turn off the “save location” option. I recommend that you check to make sure that the location option is off before you start taking and sharing your photos.

On an iOS device, open your settings and tap the “Privacy” controls. In Privacy, tap the “Location Services” button. The location services allows you to completely turn everything off at one time, or you can adjust apps and features individually. I recommend that. Otherwise, you can tap “Camera”  and adjust them individually. In the Camera location settings, tap or make sure “Never” is selected.

The Camera will not record GPS coordinates in your photo’s EXIF metadata. If you don’t remove or disable this information from your photos, you will be sharing more information than you realize. This information can reveal a lot of information about you. If it isn’t, then you have some options for removing all that metadata from your photos. You can definitely prevent your cameraphone from recording your location.

If you have a camera with GPS built in, I recommend that you check your manufacturer’s instruction manual to learn how to turn it off.

If you’ve never been a victim of cyber stalking and harassment, then chances are you probably don’t care about this issue. I never thought I’d have to deal with it either. Unfortunately, I didn’t know about any of this until it was too late. Prevention is always better than dealing with a situation after the fact.

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How to View and Remove EXIF Data

When you take a picture with your camera or phone, it records EXIF metadata, which you can later view in the image’s properties. You cannot stop EXIF metadata from being added to your photographs. You can prevent geotagging by turning it off in your camera or camera app. If your photo already has getotagging and you want to remove all of its EXIF data, there is a way to do it after the fact.

To view and remove EXIF data in Windows, first choose the photo or photos you want to remove the EXIF information from, then right-click and select “Properties.”

If you want to add metadata, you can select values and edit the “Details.” If you want to remove the metadata from your photos, then click “Remove Properties and Personal Information” at the bottom of the properties dialog.

The Remove Properties dialog allows you to make a copy of your photos with “all possible properties” removed or you can click “remove the following properties from this file” and then check the boxes next to each item you want to delete.

If you are trying to remove information in OS X, you’ll have to use a third-party software if you want to easily and completely strip the metadata out of your photos. However, you do have the option to remove the location data from photos in Preview. Open your photo, select “Tools” then “Show Inspector” or press Command+I on your keyboard. Then, click the “GPS” tab, and “Remove Location Info” at the bottom.

Most likely, there is a lot of other information that you probably want to remove as well.

Removing EXIF is a really good idea, especially if you’re like me and have privacy concerns. I would strongly recommend removing the geolocation information. It is really simple to stop geolocation data from ever being stored in your images by turning it off in Android and iOS to begin with.

Traveling, Vacation and Online Safety

Travel has become more digital. A large portion of Americans took care of their travel reservations ‒ flights, hotels, cruises ‒ on mobile devices last year.

Here are some tips to avoid digital danger:

 

  • Keep a clean machine: Before you hit the road, make sure all security and critical software is up-to-date on your Internet-connected devices and keep them updated during travel.
  • Get two steps ahead: Turn on two-step authentication (also known as multi-factor authentication) for an extra layer of security beyond the password that is available on most major email, social and financial accounts.
  • Make sure all devices are password protected: Use a passcode or security feature (like a finger swipe) to lock your phone or mobile device.
  • Think before you app: Review the privacy policy and understand what data (such as location and entry to your social networks) the app can access on your device before you download. Delete apps you are no longer using.
  • Own your online presence: Set the privacy and security settings on web services and devices. Limit how and with whom you share information!
  • Actively manage location services: Location tools come in handy while planning your trip or navigating a new place, but they can also expose your location ‒ even through photos. Turn off location services when not in use.
  • Get savvy about WiFi hot spots: Do not transmit personal info or make purchases on unsecure networks. Instead, use a virtual private network (VPN) or your phone as a personal hotspot to surf more securely.
  • Turn off WiFi and Bluetooth when idle: When WiFi and Bluetooth are on, they connect and track your whereabouts. If you do not need them, switch them off.
  • Protect your $$$: Be sure to shop or bank only on secure sites. Web addresses with “https://” or “shttp://”, means the site takes extra security measures. However, an “http://” address is not secure.
  • Never use public computers to log in to any accounts: Be extremely cautious on public computers in airports, hotel lobbies and Internet cafes. Keep activities as generic and anonymous as possible.
  • Share with care: Think twice before posting pictures that you would not want certain people (like your parents or employer) to see or photos that would reveal you are traveling.
  • Post only about others as you would have them post about you: The golden rule applies online, too.

The kick-off to summer brings increased Internet and mobile device use. STOP.THINK.CONNECT

The kick-off to summer brings increased Internet and mobile device use. NCSA has teamed up with ConnectSafely to help people of all ages to take security measures, understand the consequences of their behavior and enjoy the Internet!

“June is a great time to appreciate the warm weather and to consider how the season impacts our online lives. The Internet greatly enhances our summer experiences as we use technology to plan, enrich and share our activities,” said Michael Kaiser, NCSA’s executive director. “To support Internet Safety Month, we partnered with ConnectSafely, a leader in helping families online, and tapped their wisdom to help parents and kids learn solid online safety measures. NCSA also has some user-friendly STOP.THINK.CONNECT. tips for family travel and brides-to-be. With some smart practices, you can help protect yourself, your family and the extended online community while using the Internet with greater confidence.”

“ConnectSafely is pleased to be part of this campaign to help everyone – young and old alike ‒ have a fun and safe summer,” said Larry Magid, ConnectSafely’s CEO. “Besides ‘wear sunscreen to avoid overexposure to the sun,’ our advice this summer is to employ security tools to protect your devices and follow our simple tips to control your online exposure and minimize risks.”