WVU Center for Excellence in Disabilities’ TBI

TBI symptoms often present similarly to Substance Abuse Disorders; People who have TBIs are more likely to turn to substances (alcohol or drugs) to cope with their injury. It can be difficult to decipher whether the symptoms (aggression, confusion, etc) are from TBI or substance use.

2.       When working with patients- “Don’t open and unload someone’s ‘baggage’ unless you have the time and energy to help them pack it back up. Let them show pieces of their baggage on their own terms”

3.       Crisis Call Center (775-784-8090) 24-hour crisis line providing a safe, non-judgmental source of support for individuals in any type of crisis; National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255) 24-hour, toll-free suicide prevention service available to anyone in suicidal crisis

4.       When working with veterans- The VA only tests for TBI in post-9/11 veterans. Anyone before 9/11 has not been tested (Korean, Vietnam, etc.) unless they’ve sought out services; The VA has adapted a “polytrauma/TBI System of Care” which is an integrated network of specialized rehabilitation programs for veterans. This allows them to access most services needed under one roof. https://www.polytrauma.va.gov/system-of-care/index.asp https://www.polytrauma.va.gov/ConcussionCoach.asp

5.       Medicaid 1115 Waiver expands treatment options for people with Substance Abuse Disorder. What DHHR’s website doesn’t mention is that it can be used to help patient’s seek alternative treatments such as cannabis/CBD oils https://dhhr.wv.gov/News/2017/Pages/DHHR%E2%80%99s-Medicaid-Program-to-Expand-Substance-Use-Treatment-and-Services.aspx.

6.       WVU CED programs and services are expansive. Their website provides good insight on what they offer- http://www.cedwvu.org/ http://tbi.cedwvu.org