WVU Center for Excellence in Disabilities’ TBI

TBI symptoms often present similarly to Substance Abuse Disorders; People who have TBIs are more likely to turn to substances (alcohol or drugs) to cope with their injury. It can be difficult to decipher whether the symptoms (aggression, confusion, etc) are from TBI or substance use.

2.       When working with patients- “Don’t open and unload someone’s ‘baggage’ unless you have the time and energy to help them pack it back up. Let them show pieces of their baggage on their own terms”

3.       Crisis Call Center (775-784-8090) 24-hour crisis line providing a safe, non-judgmental source of support for individuals in any type of crisis; National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255) 24-hour, toll-free suicide prevention service available to anyone in suicidal crisis

4.       When working with veterans- The VA only tests for TBI in post-9/11 veterans. Anyone before 9/11 has not been tested (Korean, Vietnam, etc.) unless they’ve sought out services; The VA has adapted a “polytrauma/TBI System of Care” which is an integrated network of specialized rehabilitation programs for veterans. This allows them to access most services needed under one roof. https://www.polytrauma.va.gov/system-of-care/index.asp https://www.polytrauma.va.gov/ConcussionCoach.asp

5.       Medicaid 1115 Waiver expands treatment options for people with Substance Abuse Disorder. What DHHR’s website doesn’t mention is that it can be used to help patient’s seek alternative treatments such as cannabis/CBD oils https://dhhr.wv.gov/News/2017/Pages/DHHR%E2%80%99s-Medicaid-Program-to-Expand-Substance-Use-Treatment-and-Services.aspx.

6.       WVU CED programs and services are expansive. Their website provides good insight on what they offer- http://www.cedwvu.org/ http://tbi.cedwvu.org

 

WVU faculty named 2018-2019 Benedum Distinguished Scholars

WVU faculty named 2018-2019 Benedum Distinguished Scholars

Four exceptional faculty members at West Virginia University have been named 2018-2019 Benedum Distinguished Scholars in recognition of the high caliber of their research and scholarly activity, including neuroscience professor Bernard Schreurs.
Read more about the Benedum Scholars —>

 

WVU researchers explore stroke’s effects on microbiome

When the microbiomes in our guts are disturbed, it causes indigestion. But for stroke patients, those same disturbances can affect recovery. WVU researchers are studying how the gut and brain influence each other.
Read more about their microbiome research —>

 

Two School of Medicine programs ranked in top 100 graduate programs by US News

On March 12, U.S. News and World Report released the latest ranking of top 100 graduate programs in the nation. WVU was ranked 48th in primary care medicine, and 84th for medical research.
Read more about how WVU ranked —>

 

WVU School of Dentistry takes tobacco cessation efforts on the road

Faculty and students at the School of Dentistry are leading tobacco cessation efforts at the Health Sciences Center, both in the classroom and the clinic. The School hosts a continuing education course for a multitude of healthcare professionals to learn how they can work together on treatment plans for patients trying to become tobacco free.
Read more about the CE opportunity —>

Project Coordinator Strengthening Training for Addiction Recovery Project

Project Coordinator

Strengthening Training for Addiction Recovery Project

 

The West Virginia University School of Social Work seeks applications for the position of Project Coordinator for the Strengthening Training for Addiction Recovery (STAR) grant. This position is grant-funded through September 30, 2019 and we anticipate a strong likelihood of funding renewal. The STAR project is part of WVU’s role in West Virginia’s Statewide Opioid Response. The Coordinator position will focus on administrative coordination of the STAR project, academic support to social work students participating in the STAR program, engagement with community-based providers, and interface with STAR project leaders. Apply online here.

New Cancer Therapy at WVU: CAR T-cell therapy for leukemia and lymphoma

New Cancer Therapy at WVU:
CAR T-cell therapy for leukemia and lymphoma

 

 

 

The WVU Cancer Institute offers this cutting-edge immunotherapy approach that some experts predict will change the landscape of care for advanced leukemia and lymphoma.

 

Make a referral
855-988-2273

 

Referral Forms
WVUChart

 

Find a Doctor

 

 

Screening event set for March 15

 

 

 

Women caring for women

 

Valerie Galvan Turner, MD, part of the largest gynecologic oncology team in the state, is helping to lead an ovarian cancer clinical trial. She recently gave a cervical cancer patient more time with her grandchildren.

Meet Dr. Galvan Turner

 

Clinical Advances

Visit our physician hub for more videos, news, and updates.
You can also view a list of new providers.

It’s Match Day at WVU

Match Day Ceremony streaming live today!

It’s Match Day at WVU — the day our medical students find out where they have “matched” for their residency training.

Morgantown Campus students receive notice of their residency matches beginning at noon, and the ceremony will be streamed via Facebook Live! Watch it on the WVU E-Pylons Medical Students Facebook page.

The Charleston Campus will begin their Facebook Live stream at 12:30 p.m. Watch it live on the WVU Charleston Student Services Facebook page.

The Eastern Campus will post photos of their ceremony on the WVU Health Sciences Eastern Division Facebook page.

The WVU Research Corporation seeks to hire full-time (40hpw), benefits eligible, Behavior Support Mentors for the WVU Center for Excellence in Disabilities in Morgantown, WV and Charleston, WV.

The WVU Research Corporation seeks to hire full-time (40hpw), benefits eligible, Behavior Support Mentors for the WVU Center for Excellence in Disabilities in Morgantown, WV and Charleston, WV. These positions are responsible for facilitating meetings, developing and conducting trainings, and coaching staff in the implementation of PBS. In addition, they will work with individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, traumatic brain injury, and complex support needs and their families to develop positive behavior support plans.

For complete job descriptions and to apply for these positions, please click here:

Morgantown, WV: https://wvu.taleo.net/careersection/wvu_research/jobdetail.ftl?job=09760&tz=GMT-04%3A00

Charleston, WV: https://wvu.taleo.net/careersection/wvu_research/jobdetail.ftl?job=10070&tz=GMT-04%3A00.

Grafton City Hospital’s Behavioral Medicine Department is currently seeking a full-time, LICSW, LCSW, or LPC

Great Opportunity for LICSW, LCSW, or LPC

 

Grafton City Hospital’s Behavioral Medicine Department is currently seeking a full-time, LICSW, LCSW, or LPC to provide therapy services in an out-patient setting.  Grafton is centrally located within 20-30 minutes of Clarksburg, Fairmont, and Morgantown.   This position provides an opportunity to work in a friendly, progressive and professional environment with a competitive salary and benefits. The position requires a minimum of a master’s degree in social work, counseling or psychology , as well as a MINIMUM professional license at the LCSW, LICSW, or LPC level.  A lower licensure level cannot be considered. If you are energetic, clinically-minded, and creative with the desire to help others, please send inquiries to:

 

 

Dr. PJ Neer

 

1 Hospital Plaza

Grafton, WV 26354

 

Or fax to: 304-265-5431

PROTECTING CHILDREN, PRESERVING FAMILIES:Lessons from the Indian Child Welfare Act

 a WVU School of Social Work co-sponsored event approved for CE hours in Morgantown on 10/30. Please share widely 

https://socialwork.wvu.edu/ce/continuing-education

PROTECTING CHILDREN, PRESERVING FAMILIES:Lessons from the Indian Child Welfare Act
Presented by: Sarah Kastelic, Ph.D., M.S.W., Executive Director of the National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA)
October 30, 2018
7-8pm

WVU Mountainlair Ballroom, Morgantown, WV
Free parking upper floor Mountainlair Garage after 6pm

Approved for 1 SW CE hour for licensed social workers in WV, PA, MD, & VA
No RSVP needed

Event sponsored by the Carolyn Reyer Fund for Native American Studies with assistance from: the Department of Political Science, Department of Psychology, College for Education & Human Resources-Child Development & Family Studies Program and School of Social Work.

Dr. Kastelic will address the historic roots of the passage of the Indian Child Welfare Act, in particular, the importance of tribal and cultural affiliation for American Indian and Alaska Native children, and for Indigenous peoples generally. The passage of ICWA, and ongoing measures to see that it is uniformly enforced, are part of overall efforts to prevent Native children from becoming “cultural orphans.” All those who work to protect children and facilitate healthy, functioning families will be able to learn from the example of the strong advocacy provided through the initial passage of ICWA and the important work that continues through the National Indian Child Welfare Assoc. today. Nationwide, many states have seen increases in the percentage of children being removed from their homes due to the co-mingled factors of parental drug abuse and child neglect. Indeed, states that have been heavily impacted by the current opioid crisis, including West Virginia, depend on the skills of effective social workers to protect children and assist in their foster care placement and/or adoption when necessary